The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.
-19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution 

Our words, actions, and culture promote a workplace of inclusion and belonging where all employees have the same opportunity to contribute and succeed.
-Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City Diversity and Inclusion Statement 

Banking on Her: The History of Women at the Kansas City Fed

Through struggle and protest, determination and might, the supporters for voting equal rights witnessed the fruit of their labor with ratification of the 19th Amendment on August 18th, 1920. Since then, this nation has experienced a momentous transformation in the life and careers of all its citizens. Here at the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, the work of its female employees help the Bank fulfill its mission of working in the public’s interest by supporting economic and financial stability. Without these capable individuals, the Bank itself would not be able to continue to innovate and grow as it serves its diverse seven-state district.

In memory of the ratification of the 19th Amendment and its impact on the nation, we celebrate the history of women who serve or have served in the 10th District over the Last 100 Years. PDFTo learn more about the history of women at the Kansas City Fed.

External LinkTo access the Banking on Her exhibit activity.

Image Description. Sepia photograph of a Caucasian woman with a neutral expression.

1914: The Federal Reserve opens with 15 employees, 5 being female stenographers including Katherine Dalton. These women earned on average $60 a month.

Image Description. An image of an enlistment poster for the WAVES shows a woman in uniform and says, that was the day I joined the WAVES.

Fourteen female employees supported the U.S.’s effort in WWII by joining the U.S. Coast Guard Women’s Reserve (SPARS), the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps (WAACS), and the Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service (WAVES).

Image Description. Black and white photograph shows a Caucasian woman siting at a table while a dozen men stand around her.

1971: Virginia Sutton is named the Reserve Bank's first female auditor.

Image Description. Black and white photograph of a Caucasian woman with short, curled gray hair, smiling.

1984: Doris Drury, founding director of the Women’s Bank of Denver, becomes the first chairman of the Reserve Bank's Board of Directors.

Image Description. Black and white photograph of a Caucasian woman with short brown hair, smiling.

1994: Julie Stackhouse is named as the first female Senior Vice President.

Image Description. Photograph of three women standing, two who are Caucasian and one woman of color. A Caucasian woman sits posed in front of the other three.

2000: The four Boards of Directors are all chaired by women: Jo Marie Dancik in Kansas City, Kathryn Paul in Denver, Gladys Styles Johnston in Omaha and Patricia Fennell in Oklahoma City.

Image Description. Photograph of a Caucasian woman with short blond hair standing in an office, smiling.

2010: The Office of Minority and Women Inclusion is created to oversee diversity practices, with Donna Ward named as director.

Image Description. Black and white photograph of a Caucasian woman with short brown hair standing in an office, smiling.

2011: Esther George is the first women named President and Chief Executive Officer.

Image Description. Photograph of a woman of color with short, dark hair, smiling against a white background.

2019: Tammy Edwards is promoted to Senior Vice President to lead the Banks Diversity and Inclusion efforts- becoming the first African-American woman in the role.

Image Description. Photograph of a woman of color standing in the Fed with a group of teenagers in the background.

2020: Trudie Hall reaches her 50 year anniversary and becomes the longest serving employee in the Bank's history.

Follow this tutorial to learn how to make a sunflower pin to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment.

Make a Sunflower Pin